Showing posts with label plastics industry. Show all posts
Showing posts with label plastics industry. Show all posts

The QSO® Quick Shut-off Valve from Glycon Corporation

A better quick shut-off non-return valve for the Plastics Industry.

QSO Valve by Glycon
Injection molding applications require two important criteria from a non-return valve:

  1. Rapid material shut off for part weight consistency
  2. A smooth, high-flow profile to prevent material degradation. 

The Glycon QSO® valve is the only valve that provides you both. The result is higher quality parts, fewer rejects, improved yield, and a better return on every pound of material you run.

Compared to traditional ball and ring check valves, only the QSO® Quick Shut-off Valve delivers both high flow and raid shut-off. Plastics molders prefer the QSO® because:

  • The QSO® ends short shots!
  • The QSO® reduces scrap rates
  • The QSO® optimize part weight consistency
  • The QSO® prevents material degradation
  • The QSO®is perfect for filled materials
  • The QSO® eliminates need for decompression or “suck back”
  • The QSO® maintains smooth material flow path
  • The QSO®is designed for long lasting and durable
QSO Valve by Glycon


Which Melt Pressure Sensor Is Good for My Application?

Melt Pressure Sensor Selection

So how do I choose the right melt pressure sensor for my application? 

A sensor is defined through the following specifications:

  • Pressure Range
  • Process connection
  • Electrical output and connection
  • Capillary configuration (rigid/flexible)
Melt Pressure Sensor

There are more variables come into play, but let's focus on these four since they are the most critical.

Melt Pressure Sensor Pressure Range


The pressure inside a plastics processing machine can usually be estimated well enough to determine a sensor's good pressure range. The typical working pressure should be within 20%-80% of the sensor's pressure range to balance accuracy and lifetime.

Melt Pressure Sensor Process Connection


For threaded connections in plastics processing, a standard has developed over time, which is the ½"-20UNF thread with a conical sealing face. There might be situations where different thread sizes or a flange connection is required. There are numerous options available from manufacturers, such as Dynisco, to satisfy customer needs regarding the process connection.

Melt Pressure Sensor Electrical Output


Melt Pressure Sensor Electrical Output

A pressure sensor is an electro-mechanical device that converts a mechanical effect (pressure deflects a thin piece of metal) into an electrical signal through a strain gauge. The strain gauge changes its resistance by following the deflection of the metal piece. In the simplest case, the strain gauge signal can be used directly to feed a read-out device to display the pressure.  In order to accommodate industry-standard equipment, such as process control equipment, manufacturers like Dynisco supplies sensors with different amplified output options such as 4-20mA or 0-10V.

Melt Pressure Sensor Capillary Configuration

Melt Pressure Sensor Capillary

A typical pressure sensor has a liquid-filled capillary that connects the process-connection diaphragm (which is deflected by the process pressure) and the measuring diaphragm (where the strain gauge is bonded). This capillary is necessary to create a heat barrier, as the strain gauge cannot withstand the typical process temperatures at plastics processing. Also, the sensor's electronics need to be kept away from heat sources as well as possible. To find a suitable mounting location for the electronics, countless combinations of the rigid stem and flexible connection lengths are available.

Other Considerations in choosing a Melt Pressure Sensor:

  • Diaphragm materials
  • Diaphragm coatings
  • Approvals and certifications

For assistance in selecting or applying any plastics molding equipment, contact AP Corp. by calling (508) 351-6200 or visit their website at https://a-pcorp.com.

Plastics Industry Feed Screw Classification White Paper

The feed screw is used in plastics extrusion to force melting plastic resin through a die into a mold to form a desired shape. As screw designs have evolved through the years, there are several generic categories.

Glycon Corporation, the industry leader manufacturer of high performance and innovative feed screws, has put together this white paper describing the classifications of feed screws used in the plastics industry.








AP Corp.
https://a-pcorp.com
(508) 351-6200

Why Plastics Industry Feed Screws are Designed the Way They Are

Feed screw selection
Download the white paper here.

The selection of the proper screw for a given injection molding or extrusion application can be critical to its success.

Screw geometry — length-to-diameter ratio, profile, channel depth, compression ratio, helix angle and a host of special design features — has everything to do with how well the screw performs in a given application.

There are documented applications where customers have improved production rates or reduced cycle times by 30 or 40% simply by switching to an improved screw design. Similarly, reject rates have been lowered from more than 4-6% to less than 1% by incorporating a custom designed mixing screw.

And experience shows that the amount of color concentrate required to achieve optimum color mix can be typically reduced from 4% (of the total blend) to 2%, just by using an optimized screw design. When considering resin and concentrate costs, payback for an optimized screw and non-return valve design can be almost immediate.

This white paper, published by Glycon Corporation, provides an in-depth look into plastics industry feed screw design.