Showing posts with label pressure. Show all posts
Showing posts with label pressure. Show all posts

Which Melt Pressure Sensor Is Good for My Application?

Melt Pressure Sensor Selection

So how do I choose the right melt pressure sensor for my application? 

A sensor is defined through the following specifications:

  • Pressure Range
  • Process connection
  • Electrical output and connection
  • Capillary configuration (rigid/flexible)
Melt Pressure Sensor

There are more variables come into play, but let's focus on these four since they are the most critical.

Melt Pressure Sensor Pressure Range


The pressure inside a plastics processing machine can usually be estimated well enough to determine a sensor's good pressure range. The typical working pressure should be within 20%-80% of the sensor's pressure range to balance accuracy and lifetime.

Melt Pressure Sensor Process Connection


For threaded connections in plastics processing, a standard has developed over time, which is the ½"-20UNF thread with a conical sealing face. There might be situations where different thread sizes or a flange connection is required. There are numerous options available from manufacturers, such as Dynisco, to satisfy customer needs regarding the process connection.

Melt Pressure Sensor Electrical Output


Melt Pressure Sensor Electrical Output

A pressure sensor is an electro-mechanical device that converts a mechanical effect (pressure deflects a thin piece of metal) into an electrical signal through a strain gauge. The strain gauge changes its resistance by following the deflection of the metal piece. In the simplest case, the strain gauge signal can be used directly to feed a read-out device to display the pressure.  In order to accommodate industry-standard equipment, such as process control equipment, manufacturers like Dynisco supplies sensors with different amplified output options such as 4-20mA or 0-10V.

Melt Pressure Sensor Capillary Configuration

Melt Pressure Sensor Capillary

A typical pressure sensor has a liquid-filled capillary that connects the process-connection diaphragm (which is deflected by the process pressure) and the measuring diaphragm (where the strain gauge is bonded). This capillary is necessary to create a heat barrier, as the strain gauge cannot withstand the typical process temperatures at plastics processing. Also, the sensor's electronics need to be kept away from heat sources as well as possible. To find a suitable mounting location for the electronics, countless combinations of the rigid stem and flexible connection lengths are available.

Other Considerations in choosing a Melt Pressure Sensor:

  • Diaphragm materials
  • Diaphragm coatings
  • Approvals and certifications

For assistance in selecting or applying any plastics molding equipment, contact AP Corp. by calling (508) 351-6200 or visit their website at https://a-pcorp.com.

Gas Turbine Monitoring with Kistler Pressure and Acceleration Sensors


AP Corporation is pleased to present Gas Turbine Monitoring with Kistler Pressure and Acceleration Sensors

Kistler high-temperature measuring systems allow measuring thermoacoustics phenomena in harsh environments with extreme temperatures up to 700°C.
  • Safe and reliable operation of gas turbines thanks to combustion dynamics monitoring.
  • Differential charge amplifier designed for high temperature sensors.
  • High temperature acceleration sensors measuring vibrations.
  • High temperature pressure sensors measuring pressure pulsations.
  • Reliable monitoring with durable sensors in harsh environments and up to 700°C / 1300°F.
  • Predict, monitor and analyze combustion dynamics.
  • Complete differential, ground insulated measuring chains enable early detection of smallest pressure pulsations.
Features of Kistler measuring equipment for combustion dynamics monitoring:
  • Resistant to high temperature (700°C / 1300°F)
  • Ex certified and interference resistant (EMI, RF)
  • PiezoStar sensing element - not pyroelectric and no popcorn effect
For more information, contact AP Corp. for Kistler products in New England. You can reach them by calling (508) 351-6200 or visit https://a-pcorp.com.

Check Out the Current AP Corp. Line Sheet

AP Corp. represents the top manufactures of industrial sensors and instrumentation. Product categories include Analyzers, Color Sensors, Displacement Sensors, Flow Sensors, Instrumentation (Data Acquisition), Load Cells & Instrument Hardware, Machine Controls, Pressure Gauges, Pressure Sensors, Sanitary Sensors, Sound Sensors, Strain Gages, Temperature Sensors, and Vibration Sensors. As one of New England's and New York's premier Manufacturer's, AP Corp. will assist you in selecting the perfect sensor for your application.

Check out the AP line sheet by reviewing the embedded document below, or you can download a PDF line sheet from this page on the AP Corp. web site.

AP Corp.
https://a-pcorp.com
(508) 351-6200

Three Types of Common Industrial Sensors: Inductive, Capacitive, and Photoelectric


Three common industrial sensors are inductive proximity sensors, capacitive proximity sensors, and photoelectric sensors.

Inductive sensors can detect a target from 0.5 millimeters to 40 millimeters. They only detect metallic targets and therefore use a magnetic field to detect presence when a ferrous metal enters the magnetic field.

Capacitive proximity sensors on the other hand can detect dielectric materials such as liquids plastic glass, wood and granulated substances as long as it has a dielectric constant of 1.2 or more. Their range is from three millimeters to 15 millimeters depending on the dielectric material to be detected.

Photoelectric sensors have the greatest detection range from one millimeter to 25 meters or more. They operate by the use of an emitter which transmits a beam of light to the receiver. They operate by detecting the presence, or absence, of a light beam sent from transmitter to receiver.

These are three very basic sensor technologies used in many common applications. The video above provides an elementary understanding of the operational differences.

For more information on any industrial or OEM sensor, contact AP Corporation by visiting https://a-pcorp.com or by calling 508-351-6200