Showing posts with label Upstate New York. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Upstate New York. Show all posts

Now Representing Sensuron - Ultrafine Distributed and Continuous Strain & Temperature Sensing

Now Representing Sensuron

AP Corp is pleased to announce its selection as Sensuron's New England and Upstate New York Authorized Representative.

ABOUT SENSURON
Starting as an informal partnership with NASA and a formal licensing agreement in 2011, Sensuron began developing off-the-shelf fiber optic sensing systems and then designing cutting-edge fiber optic sensing platforms that allowed companies to consolidate their testing and measurement solutions. Sensuron is now a leading global provider of distributed strain and temperature sensing platforms for applications across industries and is now expanding to liquid-level and 2D deflection.

Sensuron's fiber optic sensing technology enables engineers to perform structural testing, design optimization, structural health monitoring, thermal mapping, and shape sensing with an efficient, robust, and simple-to-use tool.

AP Corp is proud to be representing Sensuron in all of New England and Upstate New York. For more information call (508) 351-6200 or visit this web page.

AP Corp.
One Tara Boulevard
Suite 200
Nashua, NH 03062
www.a-pcorp.com
508-351-6200 (office)

Combat the Hazards of Plastics Screw and Barrel Wear

Combat the Hazards of Plastics Screw and Barrel Wear

This post is abstracted from an excellent article from Plastics Technology Online
written by Jim Callari. Read the full text here.

Industrial-grade screw and barrel wear cuts throughput speeds, producing scrap before shutting down. For the first time, technology is making progress in unraveling the mystery of screw and barrel wear. 

There has been a lot of injection molding machine innovation in the past year. And now, Glycon Corp. has the technology to test wear within the plasticating device. Glycon is in the first phase of rolling this technology out in the industry. It will concentrate on extrusion and blow molding. 

With this capability, they have developed the technology to calculate the rate of wear and predict future wear. This data determines the most cost-effective time to replace these components.

Glycon has been working on measuring wear since 1986 gained their first patent as Great Lakes Feedscrews. The company expanded the invention to include measuring barrel wear and was awarded additional patents in 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2019. 

Wear and tear challenges are well documented over the years, and plastic processors know the symptoms. Many machine operators compensate by making changes to the screw speed or temperature settings. The problem is, both of these changes would ultimately result in lower efficiency and higher scrap rates. 

The new system called EMT (short for Electronic Measurement and Tracking), includes Glycon's flite-scan eddy-current sensors mounted in one or more positions within a SmartBarrel. These barrels also have SmartPorts, another innovative technology offered by Glycon. 

Measurements will be conducted routinely at the processor's plant by field technicians using a Flite-Scan sensor. Several eddy-current sensors were tried over the years. Multiple sensor manufacturers were collaborated with, but all ran into failure at high temperatures in the plasticating units. 

Micro-Epsilon, a leading manufacturer of sensors that measure displacement, distance, position, vibration, dimension and thickness, was the eventual choice because their sensors proved much more robust and provided reliable readings up to 600 F. 

The EMT system is not only to analyze the data to determine the optimum time to replace or repair worn screws or barrels to optimize productivity but also to relate the wear to:

  • Materials of screw/barrel construction.
  • Screw/barrel alignment. 
  • Polymers being processed.
  • Impact of abrasive fillers.
  • Performance related to wear, including production rates, cycle times, energy consumption, melting rates, head pressures and melt temperatures.

The Glycon EMT system's advantages are that it provides precise measurement of the wear on the OD of the feedscrew and the barrel's ID and its simplicity and cost-effectiveness. It allows maintenance personnel to plan to measure intervals and to schedule changeouts at convenient times based upon wear-rate data rather than 'running to failure' and having to run inefficiently or not at all.

For more information about the new Glycon technology in New England and Upstate New York, contact AP Corp. Call them at (508) 351-6200 or visit their website at https://a-pcorp.com.

Do You Have a Production Part Heating Challenge? Get Free Assistance from The LAB

Part Heating Lab

Ambrell's Applications Laboratory, known in the industry as THE LAB, will solve your most challenging heating applications. They will provide recommendations for precision induction heating solutions for parts of every size, shape, and material composition. 

THE LAB will apply their state-of-art testing facility, fully equipped with Ambrell induction heating systems and hundreds of proven coils. You can also interface with their engineers and see first-hand how they design prototype coils and develop innovative, practical solutions to maximize your heating process's efficiency. 

The process is easy. Just follow these three steps:

  1. Send THE LAB your parts and process requirements.
  2. Their engineers will analyze your process and heat your parts to develop the right solution for your specific application.
  3. You will receive your parts back for inspection, as well as a video of the heating process and a laboratory report with a system recommendation.

You have the option to observe testing through Ambrell's Remote Lab Service from the convenience of your office.

If you have old systems that need upgrading, why not find out if using a smaller, more efficient Ambrell induction heating system is the right solution for your process? There are measurable savings in less downtime, higher production throughput, improved energy efficiency, and more.

To learn more in New England and Upstate New York, contact AP Corp. Call them at 508-351-6200 or visit their website at https://a-pcorp.com.

Dynisco Cloud Connect™

With the new Dynisco Cloud Connect™ through Microsoft® Azure – you get a single cloud solution that aggregates all your device(s) data into one place that is secure, reliable, easy to share, with 24/7 support.

The Dynisco Cloud Connect can be used for one product or entire global production lines –whether across the street or across the globe giving you easy access to manage data across the cloud, no matter where it lives. This solution is easily expandable and is even compatible with multiple brands and equipment types, from sensors to melt flow indexers to rheometers. With Dynisco Cloud Connect, you can compare and correlate data between facilities and be able to monitor and adjust parameters in real-time, from a mobile device anywhere in the world, whether working in the field, on the production floor, or in the office. 

For more information about Dynisco products in New England and Upstate New York, contact AP Corp. Call them at (508) 351-6200 or visit their website at https://a-pcorp.com.

Which Melt Pressure Sensor Is Good for My Application?

Melt Pressure Sensor Selection

So how do I choose the right melt pressure sensor for my application? 

A sensor is defined through the following specifications:

  • Pressure Range
  • Process connection
  • Electrical output and connection
  • Capillary configuration (rigid/flexible)
Melt Pressure Sensor

There are more variables come into play, but let's focus on these four since they are the most critical.

Melt Pressure Sensor Pressure Range


The pressure inside a plastics processing machine can usually be estimated well enough to determine a sensor's good pressure range. The typical working pressure should be within 20%-80% of the sensor's pressure range to balance accuracy and lifetime.

Melt Pressure Sensor Process Connection


For threaded connections in plastics processing, a standard has developed over time, which is the ½"-20UNF thread with a conical sealing face. There might be situations where different thread sizes or a flange connection is required. There are numerous options available from manufacturers, such as Dynisco, to satisfy customer needs regarding the process connection.

Melt Pressure Sensor Electrical Output


Melt Pressure Sensor Electrical Output

A pressure sensor is an electro-mechanical device that converts a mechanical effect (pressure deflects a thin piece of metal) into an electrical signal through a strain gauge. The strain gauge changes its resistance by following the deflection of the metal piece. In the simplest case, the strain gauge signal can be used directly to feed a read-out device to display the pressure.  In order to accommodate industry-standard equipment, such as process control equipment, manufacturers like Dynisco supplies sensors with different amplified output options such as 4-20mA or 0-10V.

Melt Pressure Sensor Capillary Configuration

Melt Pressure Sensor Capillary

A typical pressure sensor has a liquid-filled capillary that connects the process-connection diaphragm (which is deflected by the process pressure) and the measuring diaphragm (where the strain gauge is bonded). This capillary is necessary to create a heat barrier, as the strain gauge cannot withstand the typical process temperatures at plastics processing. Also, the sensor's electronics need to be kept away from heat sources as well as possible. To find a suitable mounting location for the electronics, countless combinations of the rigid stem and flexible connection lengths are available.

Other Considerations in choosing a Melt Pressure Sensor:

  • Diaphragm materials
  • Diaphragm coatings
  • Approvals and certifications

For assistance in selecting or applying any plastics molding equipment, contact AP Corp. by calling (508) 351-6200 or visit their website at https://a-pcorp.com.

New Bench Top Series of Shaker Systems from Sentek Dynamics

Bench Top Series of Shaker Systems

The BT Series shakers from Sentek Dynamics are designed for demanding vibration test applications. Typical applications included structural analysis, calibration and testing of smaller assemblies. The BT-100 through BT-400 shakers utilize light weight rare earth magnets in lieu of traditional Alnico magnets. The use of these magnets decreases the total shaker mass to a third of similar size system, making these shakers easy to handle and portable. 

The systems range in size from 100 N (70 lbf) to 1000 N (224 lbf). Systems 400 N (99 lbf) and smaller are permanent magnet shakers and use lightweight rare earth magnets, making these systems easy to handle and portable. There are three versions of the BT Series of shakers: the BT, BT-M and BT-MTH.  

The BT Series is recommended for vibration testing of small assemblies and components. These shakers have armature diameters from 60 mm (2.36 in.) to 120 mm (4.72 in.). The BT-1000 is equipped as standard with Automatic Armature Centering (AAC) and Air-Isolation Feet (AIF).  

The BT-M and BT-MTH Series are our modal shakers lines. BT-M will use standard stingers while the BT-MTH is our through-hole version. On the 100 N and 200 N system the BT-MTH offers over double the displacement. The BT-MTH Series allow you to use piano-wire stingers. The BT-1000-M is ideal for the structural and modal analysis of high-mass structures. The addition of ZPR (electronic zero-point regulation and adjustable suspension stiffness) allows the user to pre-load the structure prior to applying a dynamic load.

The new Sentek Dynamics Bench Top and modal exciters are based upon years of practical experience. These systems all exhibit a high lateral stiffness and high force-to-weight ratio. They are specifically designed to help ensure the best possible performance with minimum setup time. 

Contact AP Corp. regarding any Sentek Dynamics product in New England and Upstate New York. Call us at (508) 351-6200 or visit our website at https://a-pcorp.com.

What is a Binocular Strain Gauge Load Cell?


Load cells, the heart of weighing systems, are mechanical devices that use strain gages to provide a measurable electrical output which is proportional to the force applied. The electrical output can be either an analog voltage or current output, or a digital on/off output.

Used for tension, compression, and or shear measurement, load cells are packaged and oriented to perform in testing equipment, electronic scales, and monitoring systems. Tension load cells are used for measuring forces that are in-line and "pull apart". Compression load cells are used to measure forces that are in-line and "push together". Shear load cells are used to measure tension or compression forces that are offset (not in-line). When selecting load cells, there are many form factors or packages to choose from to insure their physical size is compatible with space available for the application, such as inside an electronic weighing scale.

The strain gage is a resistive sensor whose resistance changes based upon the applied strain. A strain gage is attached to some structure, and when that structure is deformed (tension, compression, shear), the resistive strands in the strain gage follow the structure deformation, causing an electrical resistance change. This change in resistance is converted to units of strain or stress. 

Strain gages are used in transducers that measure force, pressure, and tension, and are often used providing stress analysis in structures such as airplanes, cars, machines, and bridges. 

When specifying strain gages one must consider the application variables, such as operating temperature, the state of the strain (including gradient, direction, magnitude, and time dependence), and the stability required by the application.

For more information about strain gages and load cells, contact AP Corp. Call them at 508-351-6200 or visit their web site at https://a-pcorp.com.

The LMI5500 Series Melt Flow Indexer from Dynisco

LMI5500
Specifically, designed for the thermoplastics resin industry the Dynisco LMI5500 Series Melt Flow Indexer has an array of features and benefits that range from ground-breaking accuracy to a unified software platform between all laboratory and online production equipment.

The LMI5500 provides a new level of simplicity of use with its simple to clean inspection plate, accessibility for sample cutting,  and improved touchscreen display.

Most notable is its own gravitational correction characteristic that takes into consideration gravity according to the units geographic location.

It is capable of delivering a wide range of data for melt flow rate, shear stress, shear rate, apparent viscosity, intrinsic viscosity, melt density, and testing conditions.


FEATURES OF THE DYNISCO LMI5500 SERIES MELT FLOW INDEXER
  • Gravitational correction
  • New Windows 10 IoT touch screen native interface
  • Built in WIFI and ethernet
  • HDMI and multiple USB ports
  • Direct digital scale USB interface for sample weighing
  • Performance meets international standards: ASTM D1238 & D3364, ISO 1133-1, BS2782, DIN 53735, JIS K7210
  • Automatic sample cutter for ease and consistency in sample cutting
  • Melt Flow Rate to Intrinsic Viscosity correlation for PET
  • Nearly unlimited program storage capability 
  • Increased access to the die for sample cutting with a strategically placed mirror to easily view the die and cutting area
  • Supports multiple languages



For more information about the Dynisco LMI5500 Series Melt Flow Indexer in New England and Upstate New York, contact AP Corporation by calling (508) 351-6200 of visit their web site at https://a-pcorp.com.

Why Plastics Industry Feed Screws are Designed the Way They Are

Feed screw selection
Download the white paper here.

The selection of the proper screw for a given injection molding or extrusion application can be critical to its success.

Screw geometry — length-to-diameter ratio, profile, channel depth, compression ratio, helix angle and a host of special design features — has everything to do with how well the screw performs in a given application.

There are documented applications where customers have improved production rates or reduced cycle times by 30 or 40% simply by switching to an improved screw design. Similarly, reject rates have been lowered from more than 4-6% to less than 1% by incorporating a custom designed mixing screw.

And experience shows that the amount of color concentrate required to achieve optimum color mix can be typically reduced from 4% (of the total blend) to 2%, just by using an optimized screw design. When considering resin and concentrate costs, payback for an optimized screw and non-return valve design can be almost immediate.

This white paper, published by Glycon Corporation, provides an in-depth look into plastics industry feed screw design.

In-Line Color Measurement for Recycled Plastic

Recycled Plastic with Color
Photo 1 - Recycled Plastic with Color
INTRODUCTION 

Color measurement is a well-accepted technology to check the quality of the color values in the production process. Usually these measurements are performed "off-line".

The delay between sampling and obtaining the results from the laboratory can be time consuming. A significant disadvantage is that only a single measurement is generated in this time period and the quality of the color during, before and after the sampling point is unknown.

With the in-line color measurements taking place directly in the melt, not only is complete documentation possible, but when color variations occur, immediate intervention can take place.

Reflection probe
Photo 2 - Reflection probe in strand pelletizer.
When recycling plastic to convert to new uniform  colored pellets many challenges can take place. Recycled plastic is much more inconsistent than virgin material. Understand-ing this inconsistency will help on your color dosing to provide a more homogeneous final product. With the proper color measurement system you can know the color values of your extrudate in real time. This allows for closing the loop on your color by changing your dosing rates to meet your specifications.

INNOVATIVE NEW TECHNOLOGY

Photo 4 - Stainless Steel NEMA4 box with touch-screen.
Technology from Equitech, a manufacturer of in-line process instrumentation, deploys a probe directly in the molten polymer. Their Reflection Polymer Melt Probe (RPMP, Photo 2) is installed on the exit (adapter) of the extruder by using ½”-20 UNF thread (typically Dynisco®). The RPMP is screwed into position in the adapter between the extruder and the die. The RPMP consists of the threaded body and optical fibers. The sapphire lens on the tip of the probe is the observation window and is very well suited to the harsh conditions in the extruder (temperature, pressure, and friction through flowing material). The self-cleaning function of the sapphire is ensured by the shear force of the material flow. Ideal installation is directly into the melt stream in the adapter.

Off-line measurements are used more effectively by downloading them to the Equitech Inline Color Spectrophotometer. This can be done manually or through OPC communications. By having the laboratory target values displayed on the Equitech system the operator can view trends of L*, a*, b* and Delta E.

This method provides complete documentation of a particular extrusion run. It also matches the known laboratory measurements giving confidence that an extrusion run has maintained specifications throughout its entirety. When color variations occur, notification can take place via digital alarms. Intervention can take place via OPC or analog signals i.e. L* feedback for closed loop color control.

EquiColor Software
Photo 3 - Trend charts of EquiColor Software
COLOR MEASUREMENT 

Illumination of the polymer through the sapphire window is achieved by 6 circumferentially-positioned glass fibers which convey the light of a xenon flash lamp. The reflection from the illuminated surface is detected by one center-positioned optical fiber. This reflected light is then interpreted by the spectrophotometer. Color values such as L*, a*, b* C*, h are calculated from this spectral curve, and displayed as trend charts, (see Photo 3).

For a continuous process monitoring, 10 to 60 seconds is recommended as the measurement interval. Intervals as fast as 1 to 2 seconds are possible. The calibration of the spectrophotometer is designed specifically for the demands of the production process. Calibration can be done without interruption of the process.

USER BENEFITS
  • Real-time information about process stability & quality
  • Impact of speed changes on the quality of the extrusion
  • Controlled color changes: start phase, end of run  
  • Avoid off-specification batches & waste production
  • Detection of dosage elevations
  • Optimized recipe formulation & process design
  • Available feedback loop for L* closed loop control via feeder
  • Comprehensive quality audit trail customer documentation
For more information, contact AP Corp. by calling (508) 351-6200 or visiting https://a-pcorp.com.

Reprinted with permission from Equitech International Corporation.

The Three Most Common Types of Temperature Sensors

Temperature Sensors
Various types and styles of temperature sensors (Pyromation).

This post describes the three most popular temperature sensors, how they function, and where they are used.

THERMOCOUPLES


Thermocouples
Thermocouple illustration showing base metal designs
with various types of junctions (Pyromation).
Thermocouples are temperature sensing devices that operate on a phenomena called the Seebeck
effect. In the simplest terms, thermocouples produce a micro-voltage between two conductors - joined at each end and made of dissimilar metals - when one junction varies in temperature and the second junction (called the reference junction) is known and maintained at a constant temperature. The corresponding voltage produced at the sensing junction can be measured and directly correlated to the change in the sensing junction's temperature.

Thermocouples are popular and widely used in industrial and commercial temperate systems because they are:
  • Cost-effective.
  • Provide good accuracy.
  • Have a sufficiently linear temperature-to-signal output curve.
  • Are available in many different metal alloys for many different temperature ranges.
  • Are easily interchangeable.
Thermocouples require no external power source to work and can be used in continuous temperature measurement applications from -185 Deg. Celsius (Type T) up to 1700 Deg. Celsius (Type B).

Thermocouples are commonly found in many industrial processes. Examples are the plastics industry, primary metals, power generation, kilns, industrial boilers, HVAC, gas turbine exhaust systems and and diesel engines. And because they are affordable and easy to produce, thermocouples are also used in many consumer applications, such as residential and commercial cooking and heating equipment.

RTDs


Wirewound RTD
Wire wound RTD
(Image courtesy Wikipedia)
Resistance Temperature Detectors, referred to as RTD’s, are temperature sensing devices that determine temperature based on a relative change in resistance of the sensing element. The sensing element is a wire or etched circuit made from a metal with a well established resistance to temperature curve, most commonly platinum, nickel, or copper.  Platinum, nickel and copper are used because they produce a predictable and stable change in resistance as the temperature changes. Normally the wire is coiled around a bobbin (made of glass or ceramic), and inserted into a protective sheath. Alternatively, RTD's can also be manufactured as a thin-film, etched element with the pure metal deposited on a ceramic base, very similar to the way a printed circuit is made.

RTD’s are popular because:
  • They offer considerably higher accuracy and repeatability than thermocouples.
  • Can be used up to 600 Deg. Celsius.
  • Thin film RTD
    Thin-film RTD
    (Image courtesy of Wikipedia)
  • Can be integrated directly on the part to be monitored.
They are used where accuracy is important, such as in biomedical applications, semiconductor processing and temperature critical industrial applications. They tend to be higher priced than thermocouples because they are made of pure metals, and they do need an excitation voltage from an external source for the device to be read.


THERMISTORS


Thermistor
Another very common temperature sensing device is the thermistor. Thermistors are also a resistance measuring device similar to RTD’s. However, instead of using a pure metal as the resistance element, thermistors employ a very inexpensive polymer or ceramic resistance element. While these materials are very cost-effective, the downside is the resistance-to-temperature output curve. The change in resistance to a corresponding temperature change is very non-linear, and as such, make thermistors' use practical only within a narrow temperature range.

Thermistors are very inexpensive and have a very fast response making them very attractive in applications where a narrow sensing range exists and cost is important. Thermistors also come in two varieties, PTC, or positive temperature coefficient, and NTC, or  negative temperature coefficient. PTC's resistance increases with increasing temperature,  while NTC's resistance decreases with increasing temperature.

Thermistors are used widely in food processing in digital thermostats, and for on-board temperature monitoring of electronics and circuit boards. They are also used widely in many consumer appliances.

For more information on any temperature sensing application, contact AP Corp and discuss your requirement with one of their experienced application experts. They can be reached at (508) 351-6200 or visit them at https://a-pcorp.com.

Dynisco Online Viscosity Measurement


From the Dynisco presentation "From lab to production, providing a window into the process."

Get maximize extrusion efficiency with Dynisco Online Rheological Testing.

Dynisco online rheometers provide a "window into your process" with the ability to continuously measure critical parameters form melt flow ratio to intrinsic / relative / melt viscosity and from constant shear rate to shear sweep.

The video above introduces the Dynisco ViscoSensor, CMR IV, and FCR and presents the viewer a cost justification for their use. You can also download the presentation from the AP Corp. website here.

For more information in New England and Upstate New York, contact AP Corp. by calling (508) 351-6200 or by visiting https://a-pcorp.com.

What are Plastics Industry Feed Screws and How Are They Made?


Feed screw maintenance
Feed screw maintenance.
Plastics industry feed screws, or feed screw augers, are mechanisms that use rotating helical screw blades to move plastics pellets through the barrel of molding and extrusion equipment. The feed screw transports the plastic as it changes phase from solid to viscous liquid through friction, shear, and conductive heat transfer. 

A typical feed screw has three zones. Plastic pellets enters the screw feed section where the pellets are compacted and conveyed. Next is the transition (or compression) section, where the plastic is compressed, conveyed, and melted.  Finally, the liquid plastic moves to the metering section where it is precisely controlled at optimum temperature and viscosity.

For more information about feed screws, or any part of the injection molding process, contact:
508-351-6200

Injection molding
Diagram of injection molding process.



Strain Gage Sensors with Pre-attached Lead Wires


The following is from the podcast "StrainBlog" (https://www.strainblog.com) about exciting new technology for adding lead wires to strain gages. The discussion between hosts Jim and Darryl is about the development and virtues of the new Advanced Sensors Technology C4A and C5K strain gages.

AP Corp.
508-351-6200

For Strain Gage Users Who Hate to Solder - New Strain Gage Sensors with Pre-attached Leads

Strain Gage Sensors with Pre-attached Leads

The following is the transcript from the podcast "StrainBlog" (https://www.strainblog.com) about exciting new technology for adding lead wires to strain gages. The discussion between hosts Jim and Darryl is about the development and virtues of the new Advanced Sensors Technology C4A and C5K strain gages.


Jim - The topic that keeps coming up repetitively is gauges with pre-attached lead wires. I got a myriad of customers looking for a variety of different solutions. Everything from printed circuit boards, where we've got to route very fine lead wires from gauges to data acquisition systems;  civil engineering projects where they're looking for low cost, long cable lengths, sometimes two wires, sometimes three wire. There seem to be more and more demands - what are we doing to meet this variety of applications that we sort of lump into this category of pre-leaded strain gages?

Darryl - Jim, that's a fantastic question. So, we've got this new line of strain gages we call C4A's [from Micro-Measurements], and they they're available in a bunch of different sizes. We go down right now to about a 0.062" gage length, and we go up to a 0.235" gage length. We put a two conductor and a three conductor wire on it on. We can vary the length of that, and these gages are actually made using our new technology from the Advanced Sensors Group, where we can really push the limits now both on the size of the strain gage as well as the resistance. We're really excited about these. We're targeting different markets, including structural testing, as well as printed circuit board testing. There's also another one that we've recently introduced, which is a C5K version, and that's a three element rosette, a planar style that's in a 350 Ohm resistance, and with this new technology, we can make this gauge smaller, more compact than ever before, and it really makes it ideal for printed circuit board testing, where you're trying to get up close to the components that's on that board, so that you could get very accurate, localized strain gage measurements.

Jim - Now, I think I've seen one of the C5K gages that you refer to, and that's a remarkably small planar gage. If I'm correct, the footprint of that planar gage is even smaller than the smallest stacked rosette that we've ever made. Is that true?

Darryl - Yeah, you're absolutely right. So, one of the smallest stacked rosettes we've had is the 031WW as well as the G1350, and this new planar gage will actually fit within the footprint of both of those gages. The active gauge length is less than 0.020 of an inch, and we also pre-attach three conductor, 36 gauge wire to each one of those grids, so basically, you have a planar rosette with 10 feet of three conductor Teflon insulated wire that's 36 gauge in size.

Jim - Well that seems to solve a lot of problems. With stacked rosette that you have a lot of self heating issues, trying to dissipate the heat from those three layers, down to a single plane and dissipate that. With the planar rosette, all gauges air on the single plane - you don't have a proximity issue with height of sight from the neutral axis,  you don't have that heat build up, and if I remember correctly, these are actually 350 Ohm gages, not 120.

Darryl - That's absolutely right. You hit the nail on the head. These are 350 Ohm gages, so you don't have to be as concerned about self heating effects, because of the higher resistance, and also because it's a planar, and like you mentioned, there's not as much of a superposition error because that's a planar gage and not a stack one. So there should be less correction due to bending and also less concern related to excitation and self-heating of the strain gage. We're really excited about adding this to our portfolio of strain gauges that customers can use now to do this printed circuit board type testing.

Jim - And that coupled with the fine wires solves a wire routing issue, getting those leads out from between components out of the package to the data acquisition system. Sounds like a perfect solution to me.

Darryl - Yeah, we're really excited about.

For more information on strain gage sensors with pre-attached leads in New England or Upstate New York, contact AP Corp. by calling (508) 351-6200 or visit their website at https://a-pcorp.com.

White Paper: Learn Why Eddy-Current Sensors Are Now Replacing Inductive Sensors and Switches

Eddy-Current Sensor White Paper
Recent advances in eddy-current sensor design, integration and packaging, as well as overall cost reduction, have made these sensors a much more attractive option than inductive sensors. This is especially true where high linearity, high-speed measurements and high resolution are critical requirements.

This white paper, courtesy of Micro Epsilon and AP Corp, explains why.


AP Corp
(508) 351-6200

An Introduction to Sentek Dynamics Vibration Testing Systems

Sentek Dynamics Vibration Testing Systems
Download the full paper here.
Whether you are shopping for your first shaker system, or just educating yourself on vibration and shaker technology in general, you'll find this white paper on Sentek Dynamics shakers helpful. Sentek Dynamics supplies vibration test equipment to reproduce real-world environmental conditions for global manufacturers and offers technology capable of reproducing a wide-variety of test requirements - vibration (sine, random, shock, SoR, RoR, RSTD and others), data recording and dynamic signal analysis.

Although this paper focusses on Sentek Dynamics products, it provides excellent details about shaker technology in general.


Dynisco ViscoSensor for Online Rheological Measurement

ViscoSensor
Dynisco ViscoSensor for the thermoplastics resin industry.
Specifically suited for all “return to process” looking to improve quality of their process and product by ensuring the rheological properties continuously in their production line.

Designed for the thermoplastics resin market, the Dynisco ViscoSensor provides the continuous measurement of melt flow rate, or apparent or intrinsic viscosity, directly on the manufacturing process.

To learn more about online rheological measurement with the Dynisco ViscoSensor visit this page on the AP Corp website.

Andruss-Peskin (AP) Corporation
(508) 351-6200
https://a-pcorp.com