Showing posts with label Strain Gages. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Strain Gages. Show all posts

What is a Binocular Strain Gauge Load Cell?


Load cells, the heart of weighing systems, are mechanical devices that use strain gages to provide a measurable electrical output which is proportional to the force applied. The electrical output can be either an analog voltage or current output, or a digital on/off output.

Used for tension, compression, and or shear measurement, load cells are packaged and oriented to perform in testing equipment, electronic scales, and monitoring systems. Tension load cells are used for measuring forces that are in-line and "pull apart". Compression load cells are used to measure forces that are in-line and "push together". Shear load cells are used to measure tension or compression forces that are offset (not in-line). When selecting load cells, there are many form factors or packages to choose from to insure their physical size is compatible with space available for the application, such as inside an electronic weighing scale.

The strain gage is a resistive sensor whose resistance changes based upon the applied strain. A strain gage is attached to some structure, and when that structure is deformed (tension, compression, shear), the resistive strands in the strain gage follow the structure deformation, causing an electrical resistance change. This change in resistance is converted to units of strain or stress. 

Strain gages are used in transducers that measure force, pressure, and tension, and are often used providing stress analysis in structures such as airplanes, cars, machines, and bridges. 

When specifying strain gages one must consider the application variables, such as operating temperature, the state of the strain (including gradient, direction, magnitude, and time dependence), and the stability required by the application.

For more information about strain gages and load cells, contact AP Corp. Call them at 508-351-6200 or visit their web site at https://a-pcorp.com.

Bonding Strain Gages? 5 Steps to Getting Surface Prep Right!


When bonding Micro-Measurements Advanced Sensors Technology strain gage sensors (CEA, C4A, C5K)  you want to ensure an excellent bond. The key element in bonding strain gages is surface preparation.

The video above demonstrates specific procedures and techniques with proven advantages. By precisely following these carefully developed instructions (along with the requisite procedures for gage and adhesive handling), the result will be strong and stable bonds. This video presents a procedure that is simple to learn, easy to perform, and reproducible. Keep in mind, it is very important to pay attention to detail and follow the instructions precisely. The importance of surface preparation for strain gage bonding cannot be understated.

1) Degreasing

Rigorously  degrease the gaging area with a good solvent, such as CSM Degreaser or GC-6 Isopropyl Alcohol. Be aware though that some materials (e.g., titanium and many plastics) react with strong solvents. Make sure your solvents do not contain any contaminants

2) Abrading

Preliminary dry abrading with 220 or 320-grit silicon-carbide paper is generally required if there is any surface scale or oxide. Final abrading is done by using 320-grit silicon-carbide paper on surfaces thoroughly wetted with M-Prep Conditioner A; this is followed by wiping dry with a gauze sponge. Repeat this wet abrading process with 400-grit silicon-carbide paper, then dry by slowly wiping through with a gauze sponge.  Finish with 320 grit on most steels and 400 grit on aluminum alloys.

3) Burnishing of Layout Lines

Using a 4H pencil (on aluminum) or a ballpoint pen (on steel), burnish (do not scribe) whatever alignment marks are needed on the specimen.


4) Conditioning

Repeatedly apply M-Prep Conditioner A and scrub with cotton-tipped applicators until a clean tip is no longer discolored. Remove all residue and Conditioner by again slowly wiping through with a gauze sponge. Never allow any solution to dry on the surface because this invariably leaves a contaminating film and reduces chances of a good bond.

5) Neutralizing

Now apply a liberal amount of M-Prep Neutralizer 5A and scrub with a cotton-tipped applicator. With a single, slow wiping motion of a gauze sponge starting within the clean area and wiping outward in one direction.  Repeat the wiping step with a clean gauze pad, again, start in the clean area, wipe though the gage location moving outward in a single stroke to fully dry this surface. Do not wipe back and forth because this may allow contaminants to be redeposited.

For proper outcomes, the procedures and techniques presented here should be used with qualified installation accessory products from Micro-Measurements, namely:
  • CSM Degreaser or GC-6 Isopropyl Alcohol
  • Silicon Carbide Paper
  • M-Prep Conditioner A
  • M-Prep Neutralizer 5A
  • GSP-1 Gauze Sponges
  • CSP-1 Cotton Applicators
  • PCT Gage Installation Tape
For more infomration, contact AP Corp. Call them at 508-351-6200 or visit their web site at https://a-pcorp.com.

Strain Gage Sensors with Pre-attached Lead Wires


The following is from the podcast "StrainBlog" (https://www.strainblog.com) about exciting new technology for adding lead wires to strain gages. The discussion between hosts Jim and Darryl is about the development and virtues of the new Advanced Sensors Technology C4A and C5K strain gages.

AP Corp.
508-351-6200

Check Out the Current AP Corp. Line Sheet

AP Corp. represents the top manufactures of industrial sensors and instrumentation. Product categories include Analyzers, Color Sensors, Displacement Sensors, Flow Sensors, Instrumentation (Data Acquisition), Load Cells & Instrument Hardware, Machine Controls, Pressure Gauges, Pressure Sensors, Sanitary Sensors, Sound Sensors, Strain Gages, Temperature Sensors, and Vibration Sensors. As one of New England's and New York's premier Manufacturer's, AP Corp. will assist you in selecting the perfect sensor for your application.

Check out the AP line sheet by reviewing the embedded document below, or you can download a PDF line sheet from this page on the AP Corp. web site.

AP Corp.
https://a-pcorp.com
(508) 351-6200